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David Suzuki: A Canadian Treasure

Posted in Environment, Gardening, Health, Home with tags , , , , , , , , , on 2014/08/25 by rmolby

I could not have said this any better (see image below). This is why I pick out the aluminum cans out of the trash, collect all the napkins and paper towels to compost, and collect and save food scraps to feed to my chickens.

There is no such thing as waste unless it is nuclear in nature, all outputs classified as waste in most cases can be the input for another process if you manage to catch the output before it get mixed in with a lot of dissimilar items from other systems.

Let’s not mix grey water with black water, we can use the grey water around the exterior landscape.

Let’s not mix food scraps with metals, paper and plastics. Each of these have a use or can be recycled.

I do my part, why don’t YOU do YOUR part?

Collectively we can save the planet from getting trashed even more than it already is.

roger hollander

DavidSuzukiquote

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Sourdough Starter – New Zealand culture

Posted in Baking, Food, Health, Home with tags , , , , , , on 2013/07/27 by rmolby
Two naturally-leavened (sourdough) loaves. Fro...

Two naturally-leavened (sourdough) loaves. Front: 90% white flour, 10% rye sourdough loaf proofed in a coiled-cane brotform. Back: A 3-pound whole-wheat miche. Both were leavened using a 100% hydration sourdough starter. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Well, while I had the kitchen in a warm to hot state, I thought I would get my first sourdough starter going.

Some time ago I bought several of Sourdoughs International’s cultures, and the one I am starting today if the New Zealand culture for general baking. According to their website it is a good culture for beginners.

Quote:

Excellent for the beginner

In 2003 we acquired one of these cultures from Kristeva Dowling (now in Canada). It is one of the easiest and best choices for the novice sourdough baker. It has been used around the world with great success ever since.

End Quote:

So around 16:00 today, according to the included instructions, I mixed 3/4 cup of Gold label organic all-purpose flour with the yeast culture packet, then added one cup of Crest filtered drinking water that I heated to about 90F degrees. I spun and shook the jar until all the flour was wet and it was all mixed up.

I set the jar next to my crock-pot that is cooking a pot-roast,  to keep it nice an warm without cooking it. so once the pot-roast is done I will move the starter to the warmest spot, probably on top of the fridge for the remainder of the first 24 hours, and tomorrow around 16:00 I will check it to make sure it is bubbling and alive.

Once my starter is in good shape, I hope to replace some of my flour in my bream machine recipes with some starter, and making some sourdough bread by using the egg-free recipes and using the delay timer to allow the starter to do it’s job overnight and then letting it bake early in the morning to have the bread ready by getting up time. We shall see if this bread machine is smart enough for this.

Ramblings for 2013.07.20

Posted in Blogging, Food, Gardening, Liberty, Nature, Technology with tags , , , , , , , , , on 2013/07/20 by rmolby
English: Baked loaf from Bread Machine

English: Baked loaf from Bread Machine (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Well, today I got the bread machine that my dad ordered for me. I am really excited to be making my first loaf of bread. I already have a few of the ingredients, but I am lacking instant yeast, organic sugar, and dry milk to try the basic recipes, so I will have to get those on one of our next shopping trips.

In the mean time, I cleaned the machine’s bread bowl with dish soap and warm water, and it is drying right now, and I am studying the manual to make myself familiar with the machine. There doesnt seem to be that much to it, really. There is even a sourdough recipe, but it still calls for active dry yeast… I will have to try that, and slowly reduce the amount of active dry yeast over time… I bet I can let the dough rise over night on starter alone and then let it run like a normal basic loaf… something to try later once I’m comfortable with the bread maker.

Ramblings for 2013.07.14

Posted in Blogging, Food, Gardening, Liberty, Nature, Technology with tags , , , , , , on 2013/07/14 by rmolby
Sourdough spelt loaf

Sourdough spelt loaf (Photo credit: GabeD)

I had a really nice conversation with my father via Skype.

We spoke at length about making our own bread using a bread machine, using non-wheat flour, sourdough starter using seed starters from Sourdoughs International, and a variety of other tangential subjects.

We also discussed pizza crust and how to use your grill to do some baking, such as portrayed on Breadtopia. This website is an amazing resource, and I need to order a few things from them so I can grill pizza and bread – I need a good peel for the pizza, and a cloche and proofing basked for the bread.

Dad said that he had wanted to get me a bread machine for some time, and asked me what brand and model I would like, so I looked up the bread machine that Steven Harris uses and mentioned on several of The Survival Podcast episodes he has been on. My dad promptly ordered it. Wow! I love my parents.

We also discussed capturing rain water and storing it, using collapsible rain barrels I ordered from Amazon, here and here.

So we had a good time discussing the above and I am very grateful to have such caring parents, as I see so many families struggle with their internal relations and many families get torn apart in the process.

Garden – plans for this year of 2013

Posted in Blogging, Food, Gardening, Home, Horticulture, Nature with tags , , , , , , on 2013/02/10 by rmolby
Chickens

Chickens (Photo credit: Allie’s.Dad)

I am getting into backyard farming this year, out of necessity because my pay is not keeping up with inflation and the health care premiums are going up, leaving us short in our household budget.

So I am hoping to make up for it somewhat by growing at least 2-3% of my food this year, and hopefully 3-5% next year, after I expand the vegetable garden, and get the raised bed chicken tractor built.

I am designing the raised beds around 4 foot long planks cut from 2×4, 2×6, 2×8, 2×10, and 2×12 by 8 foot or 16 foot boards, and using 3.5 inch long deck screws to screw the beds into 4×4 foot squares.

I arrange the beds so there is just a little less than 2 feet of space between them for walkways, and I use 12 inch square pavers to line the walkways. This way the beds sit on top of the pavers for leveling and less contact with the soil. I treat the wood of the raised beds with linseed oil and let it absorb and dry completely, then line the raised bed with one or two layers of corrugated cardboard  and fill them with compost/soil mixture.

When I build the wooden frames, I also attach a piece of 2×2 on the inside corners, but offset so they stick out the bottom about one inch. This way I can stack multiple beds for extra depth for veggies such as carrots, as well as stacking the chicken tractor on top of the beds as well.

As the chickens clean up the bed(s) they have access to, by churning the soil and eating every last seed, bug, and plant until there is nothing but soil, I move their tractor house to the next bed, and their run as well, and let them continue to clean the newly accessible bed(s).

The raised bed I move the tractor house from, now is well composted, has nitrogen and nutrient rich soil, that I will plant heavy feeders into the first season, and then alternate with low demand plants, followed by fallow or cover-crop, and then several other crops before I run the chicken tractor over it again.

I have part of this system in place, but I still need to built the 4×4 chicken tractor and 4×4 chicken run that will go on top of two beds, and a connector between the two so the chickens can get to the run.

I will also build a few beds that will be either 4×6 or 4×10 foot and pull the walkway pavers they would straddle, and have some bigger beds to work with for such plants as garlic and cabbages, etc, where I either need lots of plants or lots of room for a small number of large to huge plants that will require a lot of growing space.

I know, this sounds quite ambitious, but that is what I have been working towards for the last three years since I have moved into this house.

I will try to keep blogging about my garden endeavors as I find time to record my efforts. Hopefully I can get some pictures added as well to add tot he documentation of what I accomplish this year.

 

Horoscope – 2013.01.20

Posted in Blogging, Health, Home, Uncategorized, Wordpress with tags , , , , on 2013/01/20 by rmolby
Moonchild

Moonchild (Photo credit: 35mm Caliber)

CANCER Jan, 20, 2013

You may be tempted to make your love life your priority right now, Moonchild, but it would be wiser to attend to other important relationships. There may be a family member – such as a parent, sibling, or other close relative – who really needs your attention. There may have been a rift between the two of you recently, and you really need to take the steps to begin mending it. This individual, who was extremely important in your past, is also a huge part of your present and your future. Dedicate some time to nurturing this bond.

I have no idea who from my past would be so extremely important other than my father. There has never been a rift between us, but there has always been a lot of physical distance between us that has prevented us from interacting as much as we would love to.

My dad has always been important to me, and I supposed if we would be closer, distance wise, we could do so many things together that would help both of us to be much more productive.

Just spending time together when we can is always a pleasure. We are much alike and different in other way, but we always seem to get along and have much to talk and debate when we spent time together.

I really should try to spend more online time with my dad!

Horoscope – 2013.01.19

Posted in Blogging, Economy, Food, Gardening, Health, Home, Horticulture, Nature, Spirituality, Wordpress with tags , , , on 2013/01/19 by rmolby
Bottled Water

Bottled Water (Photo credit: EasyEcoBlog)

CANCER Jan, 19, 2013

If you’re having trouble figuring out how you will make it through a difficult situation, then just resolve to take it one day at a time. If that doesn’t seen doable, then take it one hour at a time. You are in a stressful phase right now, Moonchild, and you can’t see the light at the end of the tunnel. Even so, you need to realize that the light is there. You may be standing in the shadows and unable to see the light, but as soon as you get through a lesson the universe is now guiding you through, you will see the light in all its dazzling glory. Meanwhile, persevere.

This is more or less how I live my life, one day or one hour at a time, but I always keep the future in mind.

I hate living my life not preparing in any form or fashion for the future. I don’t prepare for disaster, because no one knows what kind of disasters will come your way, rather  I prepare so I can live in the near future the same way I live in the present. I stock up on some food and supplies, when something is on sale or I break something, I buy one or two extras of whatever I need, that way I have spares on hand, at least for some things, like flashlights, batteries, matches, tinder, etc.

People that purely put their faith into their God, hoping and praying he will provide for them just for believing in him are clueless and don’t know their own faith. You will be judged on your actions, not on your faith. I don’t care what religion you believe in, your actions are what you need to look out for, your God already knows your faith. And it may surprise some readers of my blog that I even went there, as I have stated before that I am not religious, more spiritual than anything.

Anyway, living your life you can really do in many intervals.

For general living and existing, the hour by hour way is best, especially at work, and you might actually live minute by minute to get your work projects done.

Next would be the day by day living, here you plan for the next few days, such as for upcoming doctors appointments and such, as well as planning family meals. You look at your supplies and figure out what you are short of, you may only one can of beans or corn to fix a meal, or maybe you have all the boxed or canned items, and just the need the fresh ones, like meat or fresh vegetables.

But while you are checking your boxed or canned items, you might discover you only have one can of something left. So you get one or two extra cans of the item on your shopping trip.

Next are the longer term preparations.

Weekly, where you look ahead two or three months, you should check to see if you need to order birthday presents online or through a catalog, to take inventory of such things as bottled water, extra propane tanks for your grill, if the spares are empty, you set them out so you see them every day, and when the extra funds are available to fill one or two, you do so.

You also check your garden and wee what all is about to ripen up, and plan meals around your harvest, you check for store sales and stock up on end-of-season items for next year. Maybe some more winter gloves or summer flip-flops while they are on sale.

Finally, for the Monthly, Quarterly, Yearly, and longer term cycles, you set goals, such as increasing your stored food and water reserves from a 3 day supply to a 7 or 30 day supply.

By planning for these increases in supplies you keep on hand, you are reducing your dependence on central authorities, and if you never need the supplies for yourself, you can use them to help others, maybe in your family or your neighborhood. Or, by not having to purchase groceries or propane this month, you can help someone financially or donate to your charity or buy that bigger birthday gift without upsetting your household status quo.

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